Global Woman

Global woman.

Juliana Ruhfus
Part two

The world needs women of vision, women whose  mission is not just narrow nationalism, but to the benefit of people everywhere.    Juliana Ruhfus describes herself as a television journalist and broadcaster who specializes in investigations and current affairs.

     “Journalists really need to globalize.   Crime globalized a long time ago, why shouldn’t we?”

Some people are warning, that  we are in pre world war II mode.   That technological progress has been so quick. that people have been left behind, and so they start going on the street or following simple solutions, that they understand, because they feel left out by the speed of the change.  Then start blaming that on “the other”.

The one thing I have learnt, if there is anything to make money off they will do it.  They will sell anything, they will sell  babies, they will steal your organs.

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Sharon Gomez-Jones

Sharon Gomez-Jones has recently been filming in the new Mamma Mia. Although she has travelled the globe with musical theatre, Sharon is firmly rooted in her home, her community,  in  Thornton

Sharon teaches Jazz and Street dance

Singer, dancer, actor , Dance teacher in Thornton Heath

Heath where she lived as a child and trained as a dancer.

“My heart and soul are in musical theatre, acting, singing, dancing to be artistically satisfied.” Continue reading

Professor, Lady Margaret Hodge MP. MBE.

Life is not a short sprint but a long journey

Google was fun

What makes women different.     I think the way in which we work is really different  from men.  Cooperative, inclusive.   Less about your own ego,  more about the the collaboration needed.   Women are much better at juggling a whole lot of things, at the same time, which comes comes from juggling home and work.   Continue reading

Anne-Marie Imafidon

more STEM women

Co-founder of Stemettes and ‘Head Stemette’ credit Stemettes

 

It’s Black History Month!

Time to celebrate the amazing women who’ve achieved in their field.

Anne-Marie Imafidon   ‘Head Stemette

One of the youngest to be awarded a Masters’ degree in Mathematics & Computer Science by Oxford University, aged 20. She is CEO, & Co-founder of Stemettes – an award-winning social enterprise inspiring more than 14,000 girls & young women into Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics.

The shortage of female talent in tech

“The challenge is in the environment. It’s true for us in STEM and also women in general. Equal pay is one step towards a more balanced workplace. HR departments need to have a better understanding of why people leave and find ways to address that to improve their culture and nurture talents. Things like parental pay, time off, sabbaticals, the language used at work and in job descriptions, to promote people, to give them responsibilities. All of these can be biased and become reasons why people leave the industry.
If we go back 30 years, 25% of people in the UK’s tech industry were women. Now we only make up 17%. Why have people left? What in the culture has made them not want to come back? “

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HeLa

HeLa
Henrietta Lacks

If nothing else Black History Month is making visible, people and events hitherto unsung.

Also this month we will celebrate women from STEM.  Science Maggie Aderin Pocock is the obvious choice.  Technology, Anne-Marie Imafidon, and the NASA women, hidden figures, see below.   Can anyone help with a woman engineer, preferably British?

HeLa

It sounds like a name of a chemical from the Periodic table. Say it out loud. A HeLa cell is used in scientific research. It is one of the oldest and most commonly used human cell lines, in research. Cells taken without permission from a black woman suffering from cancer, in the only hospital to take black patients. She later died in great pain, but she left an incredible heritage, as hers were the only cells grown in a lab which would survive for more than a few days. These cells of hers were considered the first immortal cells and were produced and used to  research everything  from  polio, to aids and cancer.

photo of HeLa

Henrietta Lacks from Wikipaedia

The Henrietta Lacks Foundation was founded  by Rebecca Skloot,

author of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.

It is believed that over 20 tons of her cells have been produced, for research, yet no one knew, until her family were asked to provide a genetic history. She is finally recognized on October 11, in Atlanta, Georgia, Henrietta Lacks’ Day.    The school  Henrietta Lacks Health and Bioscience High School in Washington commemorates her. It is so fitting that the 4 letters chosen, for the immortal cells of Henrietta Lacks should result in the word Healer.

©2017ionthecity.com

Nicola Williams is the first Ombudsman for the Military.

Nicola Williams is the first Ombudsman for the Military.

“While the power structure is still largely white male from a certain social certain class, a white man of a certain age, 50s and 60 will have his consciousness raised through his daughters. As they get older, they are more aware of age discrimination. They want their girls to have the opportunities they had.”

Nicola Williams becomes the Ombudsman for the armed services

Portrait of new Service Complaints Ombudsman for the Armed Forces Nicola Williams

Previously she was the Service Complaints Commissioner (SCC), which gives her oversight of how complaints are dealt with in all three sections of the military: Army, Navy and Air-force. Her previous post was as Ombudsman to the Cayman Islands, taking her back to her Caribbean roots.

Not bad going for a black girl growing up in South London, where her teacher’s expectation at A levels was to advise her to get a job in Woolworth.

Nicola Williams trained first as a lawyer, then barrister, then judge, Continue reading

Steve the refugee from Germany

Dame Stephanie Shirley came to England as a refugee

Founder of the first all women Tech company.

Stephanie Shirley (later known as Steve) set up an all woman software company back in 1962 and became a billionaire philanthropist, who has never forgotten that she owed her life to the kinder transport, and the generosity of the country, which took her in. She told Sue McGregor who interviewed her, “Having had my life saved, I thought it was important not to fritter it away.” Continue reading