Anne-Marie Imafidon

more STEM women

Co-founder of Stemettes and ‘Head Stemette’ credit Stemettes

 

It’s Black History Month!

Time to celebrate the amazing women who’ve achieved in their field.

Anne-Marie Imafidon   ‘Head Stemette

One of the youngest to be awarded a Masters’ degree in Mathematics & Computer Science by Oxford University, aged 20. She is CEO, & Co-founder of Stemettes – an award-winning social enterprise inspiring more than 14,000 girls & young women into Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics.

The shortage of female talent in tech

“The challenge is in the environment. It’s true for us in STEM and also women in general. Equal pay is one step towards a more balanced workplace. HR departments need to have a better understanding of why people leave and find ways to address that to improve their culture and nurture talents. Things like parental pay, time off, sabbaticals, the language used at work and in job descriptions, to promote people, to give them responsibilities. All of these can be biased and become reasons why people leave the industry.
If we go back 30 years, 25% of people in the UK’s tech industry were women. Now we only make up 17%. Why have people left? What in the culture has made them not want to come back? “

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HeLa

HeLa
Henrietta Lacks

If nothing else Black History Month is making visible, people and events hitherto unsung.

Also this month we will celebrate women from STEM.  Science Maggie Aderin Pocock is the obvious choice.  Technology, Anne-Marie Imafidon, and the NASA women, hidden figures, see below.   Can anyone help with a woman engineer, preferably British?

HeLa

It sounds like a name of a chemical from the Periodic table. Say it out loud. A HeLa cell is used in scientific research. It is one of the oldest and most commonly used human cell lines, in research. Cells taken without permission from a black woman suffering from cancer, in the only hospital to take black patients. She later died in great pain, but she left an incredible heritage, as hers were the only cells grown in a lab which would survive for more than a few days. These cells of hers were considered the first immortal cells and were produced and used to  research everything  from  polio, to aids and cancer.

photo of HeLa

Henrietta Lacks from Wikipaedia

The Henrietta Lacks Foundation was founded  by Rebecca Skloot,

author of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.

It is believed that over 20 tons of her cells have been produced, for research, yet no one knew, until her family were asked to provide a genetic history. She is finally recognized on October 11, in Atlanta, Georgia, Henrietta Lacks’ Day.    The school  Henrietta Lacks Health and Bioscience High School in Washington commemorates her. It is so fitting that the 4 letters chosen, for the immortal cells of Henrietta Lacks should result in the word Healer.

©2017ionthecity.com

Nicola Williams is the first Ombudsman for the Military.

Nicola Williams is the first Ombudsman for the Military.

“While the power structure is still largely white male from a certain social certain class, a white man of a certain age, 50s and 60 will have his consciousness raised through his daughters. As they get older, they are more aware of age discrimination. They want their girls to have the opportunities they had.”

Nicola Williams becomes the Ombudsman for the armed services

Portrait of new Service Complaints Ombudsman for the Armed Forces Nicola Williams

Previously she was the Service Complaints Commissioner (SCC), which gives her oversight of how complaints are dealt with in all three sections of the military: Army, Navy and Air-force. Her previous post was as Ombudsman to the Cayman Islands, taking her back to her Caribbean roots.

Not bad going for a black girl growing up in South London, where her teacher’s expectation at A levels was to advise her to get a job in Woolworth.

Nicola Williams trained first as a lawyer, then barrister, then judge, Continue reading

The Royal Society Science Prize

The Royal Society Science Prize

 

Cordelia Fine wins the Royal Society Science Prize

Winner of the Royal Society Science Prize 2017   Courtesy of RS.

“Suppose a researcher were to ask you

what are males and females like?

Would you stare at the researcher blankly and exclaim, “But what can you mean? Every person is a unique, multifaceted, sometimes even contradictory individual, and with such an astonishing range of personality within each sex, and across contests, social class, age, experience, educational level, sexuality and ethnicity, it would be pointless and meaningless to attempt to pigeonhole such rich complexity and variability into two crude stereotypes?”
Delusions of Gender by Cordelia Fine

Cordelia Fine’s previous book, The Gender Delusion told it like it is, but her latest Testosterone Rex, has won the prestigious Royal Society Science Prize a great achievement and victory for woman sense.  Photograph courtesy of the Royal Society.

Women are in the news quite literally this week, as Women in Journalism (WIJ) gathered at LSE with a token male editor, who more than held his own. They were there to discuss the representation of women in media, especially newspapers. Women as writers of articles but also as the subject or articles, other than celebrities and royals. with news appearing in online newspapers and also social media, it was a wide ranging discussion. Continue reading

The Chair of the Royal Society for the Arts, Manufactures and Commerce

Interview with Vikki Heywood,
Chairman(sic) of the RSA

Chair of the RSA

(Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce)

“Over my career I’ve developed  an understanding of the complexity of human relationships and the desire to engage with both your own creativity and the creativity of others, and how it enables you to think through your life and the world around you.

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Professor Dame Athene Donald

Professor Dame Athene Donald
Champion of Women’s Equality

If I had one action to change the world,  I would worry about equality.   
I think we ignore it at our peril.   That’s not just gender,  its ethnic,  it’s  socio-economic.

The Women's Equality Champion from 2010 to 2014

The Women’s Equality Champion from 2010 to 2014

Professor Dame Athene Donald is a scientist working at

The Cavendish.  Amongst many other roles she is  Master of Churchill College at Cambridge, where she was Cambridge’s Gender Equality Champion from 2010-2014.   She also chaired the Education Committee for The Royal Society.

Feminist    
I don’t’ consider myself to be a feminist    I associate the word with the sort of 60s culture, man hating.    I believe in Equality absolutely, but I don’t like the word Feminist.   I know that the modern use is different, but I still feel uncomfortable with it.
Anne Marie Slaughter speaks of strong women, who did stay in the house, but they did have dreams and wanted their daughters and grand daughters to go on to great things, but if you have  a mother who is says don’t do that, you’ll break your nails, it’s hardly encouraging or supportive.

It just appalls me the messages, Maths isn’t for girls, or  T-shirts saying I’m too pretty to do maths .

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Steve the refugee from Germany

Dame Stephanie Shirley came to England as a refugee

Founder of the first all women Tech company.

Stephanie Shirley (later known as Steve) set up an all woman software company back in 1962 and became a billionaire philanthropist, who has never forgotten that she owed her life to the kinder transport, and the generosity of the country, which took her in. She told Sue McGregor who interviewed her, “Having had my life saved, I thought it was important not to fritter it away.” Continue reading